Heart of Darkness – Day 1

Marlow is a very skeptical man of the individuals surrounding him, which leads him to having a very independent mind. He has the ability to draw images within a story an individual is telling. From the opening of the book, Conrad uses imagery of light and dark and discusses London. Marlow and Conrad work together with their abilities. Once the sun begins to set and darkness is upon the men, it becomes even more profound. The men are together recalling the ships, containing good men, that were sent off from the Thames on voyages to explore and take part in trade. In the story it says, “’And this also,’ said Marlow suddenly, ‘has been one of the dark places of the earth.’” (1696).

When the Roman first arrived in England, it was a very different and mysterious territory for the. They have never experienced a place quite like England. He tries to put himself in the young Roman captain or solider place, imaging what it would be like to be so far from home and without the comforts of familiarity. As soon as Marlow begins to speak, he quickly distinguishes the differences between himself and the other passengers. He does this by bringing up Britain has not always been the heart of civilization.

In addition, the Thames was not seen outwardly as a glorious or glamorous journey but it was seen as a inward journey in the hear of the wilderness. “Conrad plays on the images of darkness and savagery and complicated any simple opposition by associating moral darkness – the evil that lurks within humans and underlies their predatory idealism – with a white exterior, beginning with the town (Brussels) that serves as the Belgian firm’s headquarters and that Marlow describes as a ‘white sepulcher’” (1694). While Marlow understand the meaning of darkness, but in conjunction with the human condition he sees it as profound implementation.

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