The Era of Social Injustice

“Now is the time to lift our nation from the quicksands of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood. Now is the time to make justice a reality for all of God’s children” (King 1). Back during the Civil Rights Movement African Americans were penalized due to their skin color and were not offered the same rights as people with white skin. African Americans were treated with no respect and were given the impression that they had no place in society thanks to the multiple laws that left them with no opportunities to have an actual life. It took years of civil disobedience from African Americans for them to finally obtain the rights that they should’ve already had, had they not stood up for themselves, then that would still be the case. Authors convey the idea of civil disobedience as a response to instances of social injustices through the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the march on Washington, and the Greensboro sit-in.

Authors convey the idea of civil disobedience as a response to instances of social injustice through the Montgomery Bus Boycott. In 1955, the buses had different sections meant for African-Americans and whites and if a bus was filled up then African American would have to give up their seat for a white person. The author explains that Rosa Parks would not give up her seat to a white man and was arrested because the law says she would have to in that type of situation when there are no more seats. African Americans were forced to give up everything for an unjust law that favors people with white skin rather than people with dark skin and that social injustice caused people like her to participate in civil disobedience by following her example. The author also explains that Rosa Parks was a leading factor in the Civil Rights Movement because of her refusal to give up her seat and she inspired others to do what she did because African Americans shouldn’t be treated differently because they don’t have white skin. The social injustice of being judged and treated differently by skin color only inspires people to join in on civil disobedience like bus boycotts, marches, and other public ways to emphasize how wrong it is to be judged based on race. Therefore, authors convey the idea of civil disobedience as a response to instances of social injustice through the Montgomery Bus Boycott (Rosa 3).

Authors convey the idea of civil disobedience as a response to instances of social injustice through the march on Washington. The march on Washington occurred because people were wanting the freedom to make their own choices and jobs fit for every person equally and not just for one race. The author explains that the march on Washington was brought on because people were suffering against the social injustices of unequal and unjust treatment to get jobs for people with darker skin. African Americans wanted to be free and have the chance to receive the same opportunities as every other race so about a quarter-million people participated in the event. The author also explains that after the march laws were passed against discrimination of people for jobs and it passed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 which was a major step of freedom for African Americans. The fact that so many people participated in the march represents how serious the social injustices that were imposed on them really were and it made them stand up for themselves and actually make a difference in their everyday lives. This, authors convey the idea of civil disobedience as a response to instances of social injustice through the march on Washington (Forgotten 2).

Authors convey the idea of civil disobedience as a response to instances of social injustice through the Greensboro sit-in. The Greensboro sit-in occurred in North Carolina when African American students were being denied service at school at the lunch counter and the. Staged a sit-in. The author explains that even though the students stood up for themselves and fought for equal rights they were still punished and arrested for refusing to leave when they were asked to. They weren’t able to eat because of their skin color and they were punished once more for trying to stand up for themselves which results in their civil disobedience of refusing to leave. The author also explains that the event inspired segregation policies to be changed and that their sacrifice made a difference for African Americans. The social injustice of those African American students that were not able to receive food at lunch because of their skin color made them determined to disobey what they were being told because how they were being treated was unnecessary and completely unfair. As a result, authors convey the idea of civil disobedience as a response to instances of social injustice through the Greensboro sit-in (Greensboro 1).

In conclusion, authors convey the idea of civil disobedience as a response to instances of social injustices through the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the march on Washington, and the Greensboro sit-in. The Montgomery Bus Boycott occurred because Rosa Parks was supposed to give up bed seat for a white man and when she didn’t she was wrongly arrested and it proved how socially unjust society really was for African Americans and it inspired others to stand up for themselves. People all around participated on the march on Washington to gain freedom and equality in the workforce because they weren’t being treated right and were discriminated against and couldn’t get the same opportunities as other people could. The African American students who were involved in the Greensboro sit-in were refused service and when they were told the leave and didn’t they were arrested and treated unfairly and it all could have been avoided if they weren’t treated differently than people with white skin. During the Civil Rights Movement African Americans were treated unfairly in every way possible and they stood up for themselves to obtain the equal rights that they should have always had

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