Marriage Equality for Same-Sex Couples

Injustice, inequality, and discrepancy on their right of marriage. The individuals in the LGBTQIA+ had been stripped of their rights of marriage worldwide throughout history. While they desired companionship, a sense of love just as heterosexual couples throughout time, they were forced into hide their relationships.

Don’t waste time! Our writers will create an original "Marriage Equality for Same-Sex Couples" essay for you

Create order

People throughout the world were unable to express their love for their partners in who they had had great attraction for. However, in the recent times, the push for equality in marriage among all people has been displayed throughout society in a multitude of ways and events. A revolution against the injustice that the LGBTQIA+ has endured had sparked in time and through persistent efforts. Individuals of all backgrounds and identities have taken role in creating equality in the world today. Though marriage equality and rights between every individual had been opposed and prohibited throughout the United States for a long period of time, the movement for the freedom for all to marry has dissolved these bans as seen in the Supreme Court’s ruling in favor of marriage equality in 2015, the push for these rights in the media presently, and the pride events and walks that have been highlighted and held throughout the nation.

Despite same-sex marriage being illegal and prohibited for a lengthy period of time, the impetus for legalizing complete marriage equality was due to the overwhelming amount of support and push for change from angered LGBTQIA+ citizens in who were previously denied the right to marry in who they please. In the time of the late 1900’s, two homosexual men from the midwest had filed for marriage in this year and were not permitted to do so (Grossi and McFarland). Being denied their right in marriage, the couple was furious in why they could not wed (Grossi and McFarland). After being denied a numerous amount of times in separate courts, the Supreme Court was assigned to the case in where they made the final decision to inhibit the distribution of a marriage license to the pair (Grossi and McFarland). From this moment in time, other homosexual couples had begun to display their frustration and support through their marches for “legislation” of same-sex marriage (Grossi and McFarland). According to an additional article in which delves into the uprising in the support of equal marriage, “The proposition [created by opponents of gay marriage] received considerable media attention as the issue of gay marriage ignited protests [by LGBTQIA+ members] and debate across the nation and became increasingly popularized by many as ‘the biggest civil rights issue of our time”’ (Johansen). The illegality of same-sex marriage since the beginning of the creation of social structure in many cultures and populations had lead to the brewing of anger amongst LGBTQIA+ citizens in who pleased to wed. Society had proved to create a barrier between the heterosexual couples and homosexual couples as one group was allowed to unite while the other was inhibited from doing so. With the propositions being founded for and against gay marriage, clashment of opinions was displayed globally. Though, same-sex marriage was illegal for a long period of time, the motivated and disturbed LGBTQIA+ who were stripped of their marriage rights provided a role in the pushing for the legalization of everyone’s right to marry and the revolution against this injustice.

In the further discussion of the LGBTQIA+ society’s impact on the fight for the legalization of same-sex marriage and equality, dating back to the early 1900’s, the union of two homosexual individuals in marriage has been greatly debated and fought for, especially (Grossi and McFarland). Individuals state that by denying their right to marriage strips them of their freedom and basic rights of equality in which is promised by the United States Constitution (Grossi and McFarland). Legality issues had arisen prominently in the year of 1970 in when unique cases of individuals wishing to get married were said to have been denied in their basic rights (Grossi and McFarland). In frustration and with a myriad of motives, people banned together and in desperate measures, pride events, functions, and rallies were held which pushed for the legality of same-sex marriage were held throughout the country and the entirety of the world. As people became aware of the injustice that the inclusive LGBTQIA+ individuals were forced to endure, an abundance of people began to revolt against the fact that their pure basic rights were being stripped from them. The lack of fairness that these groups of people had felt had pushed them in to creating a difference, to spark a revolution that would take back their rights, credit them to love who they desire.

Though there are a myriad of ways in which the push for marriage equality was supported and expressed, the greatest factor, method, in which was used to fight this battle against marriage inequality were the LGBTQIA+ pride events and functions in which promoted justice and equal rights among all people. In the year of 1979, the initial LGBTQIA+ march was held in Washington, D.C. (A Brief History of Civil Rights). With a collective output of concerned citizens, the place was chosen as a foundation to begin the spread of marches throughout the country and world (A Brief History of Civil Rights). People had believed that by protesting the stripping of their basic rights to marry in who they please in where the capital is, the source of all governmental decisions, their efforts would be most likely viewed, noticed, and publicized (A Brief History of Civil Rights). The people in who organized and attended the march had a multitude of principles and reason for assembly (A Brief History of Civil Rights). A few of these causes include the end of discrimination of same-sex couples in comparison to hetero-sex couples, the end of adoption laws prohibiting same-sex couples from adopting a child, and the overall separation and isolation of LGBTQIA+ members from jobs, schools, and more (A Brief History of Civil Rights). From this first march dating back to 1979, ensuing marches and pride events have taken place throughout the country (A Brief History of Civil Rights). Through persistent efforts, individuals presently in the past few years had made a shaping impact on the public’s view of the LGBTQIA+ society (A Brief History of Civil Rights). Conflict, the discrepancy of opinions, and the awareness of the decision to legalize marriage had been an effect of these marches (A Brief History of Civil Rights). In an article summarizing the history of pride marches and their effect on same-sex marriage in the United States, “…[pride events]inspired a social awakening for many in the LGBTQ community and had a profound effect on the nation’s perception of persons who identify as L, G, B, T or Q as a community in and of itself…” (Pride). As seen in the initial pride march’s sweeping throughout the country, the events had left a significant impact on the United States. With the circulating attention on the legalization of equal marriage that these events had created, the legalization that is held today is a result. With media attention, more individuals were able to become aware of the injustice that the LGBTQIA+ society was forced to endure. More support was able to be gained as a result of the pride functions that had taken place in each prospect in the entirety of the nation. Although there were many factors in which drove the final legalization of same-sex marriage in the U.S, pride marches and functions can be proven to have been the sole impetus.

Although there are a great abundance of effects that the revolution in favor for marriage equality has proven to display, the battle for the right to marry has enabled many individuals throughout the world to gain the right to marry the partner of their choice, no matter of their gender or identity. The United States’ Supreme Court’s Ruling in favor of gay marriage in the case of Obergefell vs. Hodges had enabled individuals in the LGBTQIA+ society to possess marriage rights and had created effects immediately upon its closing (Barlow). From the declaration, same-sex couples across the entire nation were able to celebrate in the fact that they had now the option to marry (Barlow). Previous couples in which were denied marriage previously now had the chance to become a united force and reside until eternity (Barlow). The ruling had justified the status of couples and had allowed them to receive the same rights that heterosexual couples had always received (Barlow). Couples could now file for joint income tax returns, receive social security for spouses, and a plethora of more basic rights that any married couple possesses (Barlow). The article in which focuses on the effects of the ruling for legalization states, “The impact of the court’s ruling is that same-sex couples should now be able to marry in every state and to have their out-of-state marriages recognized in other states” (Barlow). The ruling by the Supreme Court had allowed all the residents in the United States to marry in who they truly desire, in who they love. With the legalization of same-sex and marriage quality, opportunities for every couple had arisen. With the law in effect, pairs who had relentlessly attempted to gain a marriage license and failed were put at ease. Though the revolution for marriage equality had allowed for many new principles and ideals to flourish, the greatest impact it had was on its ability to allow many individuals throughout the world to to marry the partner of their choice, no matter of their gender.

Despite there being a great abundance of effects that the urge and fight for the right to marry had provided, the greatest aftermath of the push for marriage equality has proven to be its ability in to allow members of the LGBTQIA+ society, and every individual overall, to feel as if they are accepted and as worthy of a quality life as any other individual. Topic Sentence: Despite there being a great abundance of effects that the urge and fight for the right to marriage provided, the greatest aftermath of the push for marriage equality has proven to be its ability in to allow members of the LGBTQIA+ society, and every individual overall, to feel as if they are accepted and as worthy of a quality life as any other individual. When the Supreme Court had made a decision to legalize same-sex marriage throughout the country, LGBTQIA+ citizens’ lives were permanently altered (Masci). As the decision to legalize gay marriage was made, the couples who were denied in the union of marriage in America rushed at the chance in to marry (Masci). Couples such as the Minnesota couple in the 1970’s were rejoiced and had felt as if they were finally obtaining the rights in which they should have possessed for a lengthy period of time (Grossi and McFarland). Even unmarried couples in states in which same-sex marriage was legal were previously too concerned by the fact that if they did get married, their love would be forbidden in other states (Grossi and McFarland). However, with the revolution taking place for rights and the legalization nationwide, it was finally time for the couples to wed (Masci). An article in which highlights the aftermath of the legalization of same-sex marriage in the United States notes, “Surveys conducted by Gallup over the past year find that about one-in-ten LGBT Americans (10.2%) are married to a same-sex partner, up from the months before the high court decision (7.9%)” (Masci). With the revolution for equality in marriage came the greater acceptance of the LGBTQIA+ society and in turn, the greater acceptance and comfortability of the citizens in themselves. With the ruling to hold the same rights as straight couples, a level of sameness and acceptance was created. The members that make up the society were pushed in then to become married and a rise could be seen in the countries’ overall LGBTQIA+’s couples in which were wed. The acceptance in themselves was brought out and expressed through the revolution. Though there are is a vast abundance of effects that the revolution for marriage equality had provided, the greatest aftermath has proven to be its ability in to allow members of the LGBTQIA+ society to feel as if they are accepted and worthy of a life that a normal citizen lives.

Though marriage equality of every individual had been illegal throughout the United States and world since near the beginning of establishment, the revolution for the freedom for all to marry has unacted these principles as seen in the Supreme Court’s ruling legislation of marriage equality in 2015, the media’s support for LGBTQIA+ acceptance, and the pride events and walks that have taken place throughout the nation and entirety of the world. The Supreme Court’s ruling in favor of gay marriage has allowed for individuals of all identities in to reside with in who they desire and love. The media today has shown that through the actions and support of citizens in and out of the LGBTQIA+ society, action can be made towards equality. The pride events that circulate in media as well illuminate and allude to the fact that acceptance of all is closer as society is able to gain awareness of the differences that make each individual individual. With the continuous push for the fairness in rights and equality among all, society can be proven to further accept the LGBTQIA+ society and allow for marriage between every individual to be legalized throughout the world.

Works Cited

Barlow, Rich. “The Impact of the Supreme Court Same-Sex Marriage Decision | BU Today | Boston University.” BU Today, www.bu.edu/today/2015/supreme-court-gay-marriage-decision-2015/.

Grossi, Sara M. and McFarlin, Christine D. “Same-Sex Marriage: Part II.” Adolescent Health &

Wellness, edited by Paul Moglia, Salem, 2015. Salem Online, https://online.salempress.com

“Guides: A Brief History of Civil Rights in the United States: National March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights.” National March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights – A Brief History of Civil Rights in the United States – Guides at Georgetown Law Library, guides.ll.georgetown.edu/c.php?g=592919&p=4182198.

Human Rights Campaign. “Pride.” Human Rights Campaign, www.hrc.org/pride.

Johansen, Bruce E. “Same-Sex Marriage: Part I.” Adolescent Health & Wellness, edited by Paul

Moglia, Salem, 2015. Salem Online, https://online.salempress.com

Masci, David, et al. “5 Facts about Same-Sex Marriage.” Pew Research Center, Pew Research Center, 26 June 2017, www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2017/06/26/same-sex-marriage/.

Did you like this example?

Having doubts about how to write your paper correctly?

Our editors will help you fix any mistakes and get an A+!

Get started
Leave your email and we will send a sample to you.
Thank you!

We will send an essay sample to you in 2 Hours. If you need help faster you can always use our custom writing service.

Get help with my paper
Sorry, but copying text is forbidden on this website. You can leave an email and we will send it to you.
Didn't find the paper that you were looking for?
We can create an original paper just for you!
What is your topic?
Number of pages
Deadline 0 days left
Get Your Price