Jane Eyre Passage Analysis

Previously in the novel, Jane and Rochester are sitting under a chestnut tree when Jane confesses her love for Rochester, which leads to Rochester proposing and Jane saying yes. All of a sudden, a giant storm breaks out and they run inside, but the Chestnut tree gets split apart by lightning. Now, the night before Jane and Rochester’s wedding, Jane walks to the orchard to see this tree. Jane is seeing the standing chestnut tree for the first time describing it as two dead, broken parts that are still being held together by their roots, but soon enough one or both might fall down to the ground; however, they will fall as one tree.

The chestnut tree is a symbol of Jane and Rochester’s love and the storm is foreshadowing future events of the novel in terms of what will happen with the love between Jane and Rochester. Right before Jane and Rochester say their I dos, Jane finds out Rochester is married to Bertha and she runs away. Bertha is the lightning strike of their relationship. Although she runs away, it doesn’t mean she is over him and doesn’t love him anymore. They still have the roots, which is their love for each other, holding them together. The bond that they have created can never be broken, and their love can never be broken. The storm signifies that they will go through a rocky, broken time; however, their love and roots will bring them back together eventually.

The author uses the foreshadowing to show that there will be rough times ahead for Jane and Rochester, but it still needs to be remembered that they still have roots in them that hold them together just like the tree. Jane can’t be Jane with Rochester and vice versa. It is used to give the readers hope in that you might split apart and face many challenges, but you with still be one “”tree””, even when broken. As a reader, it makes me go through the book waiting to see what will happen and wants me to finish the book even sooner. It changes the novel as a whole because I know that there is something to look forward to.

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