The U.S. Constitution

The U.S. Constitution was written during the Philadelphia Convention on September 17, 1787. It was a success because it established America’s government and fundamental laws. The U.S. Constitution guaranteed certain basic rights for its citizens while also providing an increase in federal authority. Before the new Constitution was instituted, the government was weak and states operated like independent countries. The new government was composed of three branches and to make sure no single branch would have too much power, a system of checks and balances were also brought into being.

The Bill of Rights was the ten amendments that gave basic individual protections, such as freedom of speech and religion. It also gave an individual the right to a fair trial and jury, the right the belonging he or she owns, and the power to create new laws within the Constitution. Without the Constitution, the United States would not be what it is to this day. The United States’ government works today because of the Constitution and the Constitution has allowed people to gain the rights they did not have before. Although the Constitution was written in a different time period, it is still relevant because it can be changed and things can be added to it. This contributes immensely to the relevance and effectiveness of the Constitution because it is old and many things have changed since the time it was written.

The Constitution differeients and allows the U.S. to stand out to other countries and disallows one person to rule us as a nation. Besides the Constitution for the country as a whole, there is a Constitution that each state in the U.S. has possession of. This is important because each state is different and can have its own laws according to its needs. Some rules are only needed in some states and each state having their own Constitution further contributes to the relevance of having a Constitution. A contradiction that stands out in the Constitution is the fact that is fully based on the freedom and equality of the people and yet there still being people today who are not free and who are largely discriminated upon. States have found ways to work around and manipulate the Constitution to strongly support their ideas. A primary example, documented all throughout history, is of the slavery in the south. All people deserve rights and slaves were stripped of those rights.

There are many modern day examples of inequality as well. Black people are not treated the same as white people, gay people are discriminated against, and women are treated as of low stature to men. It is sad to think that not all people are treated in the fair manners as others. The Constitution prominently speaks of the equality of all people, yet, to this day, not all people are treated equally! Several things not mentioned in the Constitution include the right to privacy, the right to a jury of your peers, and the separation of church and state. The word “privacy” is not used in the Constitution. The Fourth Amendment only protects against “unreasonable search and seizures”. Pertaining to the right to a jury of your peers, The Constitution guarantees the right to a trial by jury that is “impartial” but does not mention of peers. Lastly, the Constitution prohibits the establishment of a national religion or religious tests for lawmakers but does not clearly lay out the concept that religion and government should be non-overlapping.

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