What is Significant about the Weather in Macbeth?

Awful weather has been an image of prohibiting something evil. Thunder and lighting of ten goes with villians in writing and more often than not sets the tone for a dim and discouraging scene, Macbeth is the same. Thunder and lighting is present all throughout the play as though blatenting denoting it’s dull minutes. The image of terrible climate dependably portends awful things inside Shakespeare. The scene with three witches are the most noticeable; the witches appear three times during the play and with each entrance it’s market by the appearance of lighting and thunder; In act I they were plotting to meet Macbeth, In act III when they met Hectate, and in act IV when they summon Macbeth’s Apparitions. The witches are the play’s main antagonist because all they do is terrorize and conspire Macbeth. It’s very fitting that their entrances are marked by bad weather because bad weather symbolizes that evil is near. Like the three witches, Macbeth’s spirits are likewise continued by bad weather. In the main scene of act IV, the witches call spirits to serve Macbeth as predictions; including the furnished head , a bloody child, and a child delegated carrying tree branches.

These models filled in as warnings for Macbeth and had a major effect on the story later in the play. They were indications of caution, a portending of wickedness, and like the witches every nebulous vision was set apart by bad weather. In the third scene of act II there’s a break from the main plot line involving Lennox an a drunken guard. Although this scene was most likely intended to be a comic relief, there are still references to the main story. When Lennox arrives at the castle, he tells the guard about the strange storms he’s encountered in the night; high winds, strange screams, earthquakes and even spontaneous combustion. Unbeknownst to the characters, an atrocity is committed that same night. To conclude this, bad weather is a very prevalent symbol in Macbeth. It’s appearance is brief, yet plentiful; subtle but understood. Considering that each appearance of the witches and apparitions even the murder of king Duncan– which one could argue is the climax of the first act–it is unmistakable that bad weather symbolizes that evil is coming within the play.

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