The Power of Romeo and Juliet’s Love

Shakespeare depicts in the play, Romeo and Juliet, that love can manipulate and control a person to perform acts they would not otherwise do. The power of love can go beyond the chemistry between two lovers, by affecting the love between parents and child, and even act as a force between two people. This type of power can produce immense hatred between two households, in which one will obey those in charge out of obedience, love, and fear. Shakespeare wants his readers to know that love pushes people to obey those around them. Juliet is exceptionally respectful towards her folks which could influence her to comply with the wishes of wedding Paris and overlook the marriage amongst her and Romeo. As well as calling her parents in entitled ways, she does not argue against their desires. At the point when Lady Capulet tells Juliet about Paris’s idea of wedding Juliet, her response is submissive by saying, I’ll look to like, if looking liking move; But no more deep will I endart mine eye Than your consent gives strength to make it fly (I, III, 97-99). Juliet’s response left the decision of wedding Paris in her mother’s individual hands, leaving Juliet unable to change her mind. Therefore, when Lady Capulet gives consent for Paris to wed Juliet, the marriage will be arranged and she will be forced to obey her parents’ decision of the wedding. The Capulets feel that Paris is a good suitor for Juliet; he is a friend of Lord Capulet, cousin to the Prince, also a well respected noble. As well, Juliet’s father attempts at forcing her to wed Paris by saying, But, and you will not wed, I’ll pardon you! Graze where you will, you shall, you shall not house with me (III, V, 189-190). Juliet’s own parents have the decency to renounce their own daughter and no longer claim her as their own. Even though she does not want to marry Paris, she has no other option but to wed the man. Deep down inside Juliet’s heart and mind, she knows that becoming deserted from her parents is worse than being left abandoned by her husband, Romeo. Juliet feels her unreasonable parents forcing fear into her body, but also knows they mean well. As fear drives irrationality through Juliet’s mind, she becomes submissive to her parents’ wishes and commands, by wedding Paris.

The power of adoration controls Romeo’s heart, mind, and desires through the story, making him an emotionally unstable ticking bomb with no other option but to obey this power. All through the story, he pursues young ladies to whom he has begun to look all starry eyed for. Every time he sets his eyes on a certain girl, he discovers his way back to pain because he cannot live without the ladies he adores and the attention they give him. At the beginning of the story, Romeo is considerable more frantically in love with the possibility of Rosaline on the grounds that he realizes that she will never be his. Yet, as Romeo and Benvolio attend Capulet’s party, his eye becomes fixated on another young lady. Romeo overlooks that his heart once pursued another, for he ne’er saw true beauty till this night (I, V, 54). The power of adoration in this epic tragedy flips Romeo’s adolescent heart from fixating on one lady to completely overlooking her. Amid this time, Romeo has an obsessive feeling towards Juliet, as though everything on the planet had vanished around him and he absorbs into this fairy tale of being with her. Without attention, Romeo would be a tragedy in his own particular hands because he becomes disappointed in himself quickly. Putting himself down, Romeo’s heart controls his body, mind, and [adds] more grief to too much of [his] own (I, I, 188). He has become a man of heart set eyes and nothing more. He desires to be wanted and will set out to achieve his main goal, winning affection from a lady. Since affection has significantly changed him, he disregards the consequences and seeks after the young lady. Overlooking these future outcomes, this demonstrates Romeo is not making wise adult decisions. Therefore, his character lacks stability, making him rather emotionally controlled by the power of adoration.

The power of love produces immense hatred between the two families. This occurs when leaders control the mindsets of their followers and soldiers, and when they obey their leaders. With the power of love controlling Romeo’s actions, he becomes an emotionally unstable character. In scene 1 of act 3, Romeo pronounces his covered love for Tybalt because they are now cousins, he says, But love thee better than thou canst devise, Till thou shalt know the reason of my love (III, I, 68-69). Almost instantly, Romeo remembers the growing feud between his house and the Capulet house. When Tybalt kills Mercutio, Romeo’s heart changes and is filled again with hatred for the man. Romeo realises who is more important, family. Bouncing back and forth between loving one to loving another is mastered by this young and confused boy. The tension of love growing inside of Romeo, created when Tybalt killed Romeo’s close friend, makes him lash out and perform undesirable acts. During the same scene, Tybalt comes back to Romeo after stabbing Mercutio. Romeo fills his heart with love for Mercutio and hatred for Tybalt, murdering the man and saying, Now, Tybalt, take the villain back again That late thou gayest me; for Mercutio’s soul (III, I, 124-125). Confused and controlled, Romeo’s heart no longer belongs to himself but to the power of adoration. Unable to make wise decisions, he murders the man that killed his close friend. Feeling lost in the world, he has no other choice but to run and run away from the controlling factor in his life. Throughout the story, love is used as a force between individuals. This type of power can go beyond the regular bond between to individuals and can control the mind, body, and well-being of a human being. It will push young men to make outrageous decisions, that they would probably not do otherwise. The force of love can also be a tool to force one into thinking differently. By obeying someone of higher authority, one’s opinions and views can change. Shakespeare shows this to his readers through different characters, telling us that love can push people to obey those around them.

Did you like this example?