Poverty and Drug Abuse Addiction

Intro: One of the most popular stereotypes about drug use is that it is more prevalent among the poor. This is not completely true however as the lack of money itself does not seem to be associated with drug use. The relationship is complex and causation of poverty is multifaceted.

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Features of poverty include; low-status and low-skilled jobs, unstable family and interpersonal relationships, illegitimacy, dropping out of school, high arrest rates, high incidence of mental disorders, poor physical health, and high mortality rates. These factors are similar to conditions that affect drug use. Drug use and addiction have no single cause but the risk factors for drug use include poverty.

A person in an impoverished situation may abuse drugs or alcohol as a way to cope with the dangerous environment they live in, a way to deal with their financial stresses or a way to cope with physical or emotional abuse. Many times, drugs and alcohol are easily accessible in impoverished neighborhoods where some people actually sell drugs in hopes of overcoming poverty. Specific purpose: to inform my audience about people in poverty living with addiction Central idea: Addiction is one of the main reasons why people live in poverty Main idea.

I. Of the more than 515,000 Americans who have died from drug overdoses since 2006, most lived in poor areas where there were few job opportunities, researchers discovered.

A. Economic and social conditions appear to be driving the geographic differences in overdose rates, with some parts of the country bearing heavier burdens than others,

B. Individuals in a poor or lower-middle-class neighborhood would be more likely to abuse alcohol and drugs because of financial stress, lack of education about substance abuse, and insufficient resources for treatment.

C. A study published in Social Science and Medicine showed that individuals with a history of belonging to a lower-income socioeconomic group were more likely to engage in heavy drinking or binge drinking Main idea.

II. Of the more than 515,000 Americans who have died from drug overdoses since 2006, most lived in poor areas where there were few job opportunities, researchers discovered. It turns out that economic and social conditions appear to be driving the geographic differences in overdose rates, with some parts of the country bearing heavier burdens than others, said study author Shannon Monnat, an associate professor of sociology at Syracuse University in New York. John Auerbach, president and chief executive officer of the Trust for America’s Health, agreed that until poverty and lack of job opportunities are recognized as risk factors, the drug epidemic will remain persistent.

A. “”There is a strong correlation between drug use and overdoses and social and economic factors in the lives of people,”” said Auerbach. “”As we struggle with opioids, we have to think about more than just treatment and overdose, we also need to think about the social determinants of drug addiction and overdose.””

B. Now that we see what experts say let’s look at some statistics. The overall rate of overdose deaths in U.S. counties was nearly 17 deaths per 100,000 people. But the rate varied widely, depending on county.

C. Of this, drug-related death rates were significantly higher in poorer counties and counties with high levels of family distress. Addressing poverty and social problems is important to stopping drug deaths, because they affect stress levels, health care, access to services and social support. Main Idea

III: Individuals in a poor or lower-middle-class neighborhood would be more likely to abuse alcohol and drugs because of financial stress, lack of education about substance abuse, and insufficient resources for treatment.

A. A study published in Social Science and Medicine showed that individuals with a history of belonging to a lower-income socioeconomic group were more likely to engage in heavy drinking or binge drinking, while individuals in higher-income groups were more likely to engage in light or social drinking.

B. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration estimates that 34.7 percent of homeless adults living in shelters have drug or alcohol use disorders; however, this number does not account for the thousands of homeless people who live unsheltered in the streets.

C. Keeping these points in mind, I will now talk about the socioeconomic aspects of the problem. Research shows that when a country has a healthy middle class, and low or at least moderate levels of economic inequality, addiction rates are lowest among the middle class and at least half of them end by age 30, even without treatment. However, when unemployment tenuous employment and inequality are high and the middle class shrinks, more people are at high risk. And their odds for early-life recovery decline.

D. Abundant data support the connection between socioeconomic factors, addiction and recovery. First, heroin addiction is more than three times as common in people making less than $20,000 per year compared to those who make $50,000 or more, and higher levels of education are also linked with lower rates of addiction.

E. The relationship between addiction rates and inequality has Jong been noted by researchers who study its health effects: states with higher levels of inequality tend to have worse mental health and addiction problems than those with less dramatic differences between the 1% and everyone else.

F. Secondly, decades of survey data also show that the addiction rate among the unemployed is usually around twice as high as among those who have jobs. Some of this unemployment is addiction-related job loss. But a review of this literature suggests that in many case&. unemployment leads to addiction, and it reduces the odds of recovery.

Conclusion: Addiction is heavily associated with poverty, not just because substance abuse itself is expensive, but because addiction is often a means of escapism. Many people living in poverty abuse substances in order to avoid the serious problems they may be facing in their lives. When you’re living paycheck to paycheck and struggling to make ends meet, drugs can provide an instant gratification that is virtually absent in all other areas of your life.

Works Cited

“”Maia Szalavitz.”” The Guardian, Guardian News and Media, www.theguardian.com/ profile/maia-szalavitz.

Reinberg, Steven. “”U.S. Opioid ODs Cluster in Centers of Poverty.”” WebMD, WebMD, www.webmd.com/mental-health/addiction/news/20180326/us-opioid-ods-cluster-in-centers-of poverty#2.

“”The Financial Toll of Addktion.”” DrugAbuse.com, 30 Nov. 2017, drug-abuse.com/ financial-toll-addiction/.

Tim Winter. “”Addiction among Socioeconomic Groups.”” Sunrise House, Tim Winter, 18 Aug. 2017, sunrisehouse.com/addiction-demographics/socioeconomic-groups/.

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